Creating a Highly Interactive Honeypot With HonSSH

HonSSH is essentially an SSH proxy, acting like a Man-in-The-Middle attack. It sits between the attacker and a honeypot and proxies the SSH connections. By doing this it can log all interactions, spoof (rewrite) login passwords and even capture files downloaded by the attacker on to the honeypot for later analysis. Below is my topology: Configuring the Honeypot Server For the honeypot server (the server attackers will login to), I’m using Ubuntu 14.04

A Guide to Using Let’s Encrypt

Up until a few moments ago, I was using CAcert for all my certificate needs. A free service offering SSL/TLS certificates. The only issue with CAcert is that their Root Certificate is not included in all mainstream Operating Systems or browsers, meaning users will get a certificate error unless they choose to install the Root Certificate. But now Let’s Encrypt is on the scene. A free, open and automated certificate authority that is

Reviving an Acer Aspire One ZG5 Netbook

I was given an Acer Aspire One ZG5 (A110) and asked to try to update it. There were a few problems with it. Firstly, it was running Ubuntu 12.04 but the upgrade to Precise Pangolin had broken and wasn’t easily recoverable. Secondly, the battery appeared to be dead and wouldn’t charge. In addition I also found that a BIOS password (“user” and “supervisor”) had been set but the password wasn’t

Disabling WordPress XML-RPC and Banning Offenders With fail2ban

This isn’t something new. SANS ISC reported on this 2 years ago. The bad guys love anything that can be used in a reflection DoS and the WordPress XML-RPC functionality is a prime candidate. There are various ways to disable it, through WordPress plugins for example, or by hacking away at code. All of these are fine if you’re in control over what gets installed on the web server. In a shared

Cisco Two Armed VPN Concentrator and Default Route

Take the following scenario: You have a hub site. Branch (spoke) sites connect to the hub with a L2L IPsec tunnel. All traffic must traverse the tunnel (no local breakout to the Internet). At the hub, your VPN concentrator is separate from your firewall and runs in two armed mode. Where one interface is outside the firewall (public) to terminate the incoming tunnels and another interface is within a DMZ. As such

Banning Repeat Offenders With fail2ban

More and more I see fail2ban banning the same hosts repeatedly. One way to tackle this could be to increase the ban time but you could also have fail2ban monitor itself to find “repeat offenders” and then ban them for an extended period of time. Firstly, create a filter definition:

This will be used against the fail2ban log and will find any hosts that have been unbanned. We don’t want to